CIBJO President guest of honour at EXPO Joya in Guadalajara, Mexico, endorses agreement promoting Latin American jewellery cooperation

ABOVE: CIBJO President Gaetano Cavalieri (fifth from left), joins Miguel Cotero (sixth from left), President of Cámara de Joyería y Platería de Jalisco, and the Mexican State of Jalisco’s Governor, Jorge Aristóteles Sandoval Díaz (seventh from left) at the official opening of the Fashion Minerva promotional event at the Expo Joya show in Guadalajara.

OCTOBER 12, 2015

CIBJO President Gaetano Cavalieri has drawn attention to the growing prominence of Latin America in the international jewellery business, and in particular to the role that is being played by Mexico, the region’s most valuable luxury product market. He was participating at a gathering of political and business leaders, as well as jewellers from across the Americas, during the Expo Joya show in Guadalajara, where he was a guest of honour of the Cámara de Joyería y Platería de Jalisco.

During the event, Dr Cavalieri both witnessed and endorsed a memorandum of understanding signed by jewellery associations from Mexico, Peru and Colombia, pledging increased multilateral cooperation. The event was attended by representatives of industry organisations from other Latin American countries.

“The realisation that Latin America is an increasingly prominent force in our business – not only as a producer of raw materials, but also as jewellery designer, manufacturer and consumer market – has increased significantly in recent years,” said Dr Cavalieri, who also urged his counterparts to raise their level of their involvement in the global jewellery business.

“To realize your potential, Latin America need to be fully integrated into the international jewellery industry, and that requires that you strictly abide by the required standards and practices, a great many of which are defined within CIBJO,” Dr Cavalieri said. “But this does not mean that you should be dictated to. CIBJO is an inclusive organisation, and we invite all of you to be involved in our deliberations and activities.”

The city of Guadalajara, the financial capital of the Mexican State of Jalisco, is a central player in the Mexican jewellery industry, generating more than 20,000 jobs directly and indirectly and producing about 70 percent of the country’s gold and silver jewellery. The city is home to more than 1,500 jewellery points of sale and is the venue of Expo Joya, Latin America’s largest jewellery fair. The region of Jalisco is also a significant producer of raw materials, delivering about 7.5 tons of gold and 140 tons of silver per annum.

The status of Guadalajara, in the Mexican jewellery sector in particular and in the luxury product markets in general, was the theme of a fashion week, organised under the auspices of Fashion Minerva, a state-supported programme promoting the jewellery, clothing, footwear and textiles sectors. Dr Cavalieri and Miguel Cotero, President of Cámara de Joyería y Platería de Jalisco, participated in the opening of the event, together with Jorge Aristóteles Sandoval Díaz, Governor of the State of Jalisco, and Enrique Alfaro Ramírez, Mayor of Guadalajara.

“With a population in excess of 122 million people and a retail sector that is growing at an annually compounded rate of close to 5 percent, Mexico is on the cusp of becoming a world-class market,” said Mr Cotero. “As an industry, we are committed to making our presence felt, both in Latin America and internationally, serving as a generator of economic growth and a model of ethical business and Corporate Social Responsibility. We consider our involvement in the public governance of the industry, through CIBJO, as a key component of that process.”

CIBJO President guest of honour at EXPO Joya in Guadalajara, Mexico, endorses agreement promoting Latin American jewellery cooperation2017-12-07T11:56:40+00:00

CIBJO releases first Blue Book devoted to coral, defining globally acceptable trade and industry practices and nomenclature

Enzo Liverino, President of the CIBJO Coral Commission.

OCTOBER 7, 2015

CIBJO, the World Jewellery Confederation, has released online its latest Blue Book, delineating acceptable trade practices and nomenclature for the coral industry and trade. The document was compiled by the CIBJO Coral Commission, headed by Commission President Enzo Liverino, under the auspices of CIBJO’s Sector A, which has jurisdiction over gem materials.

The Coral Book can be downloaded in PDF format from the CIBJO website by CLICKING HERE.

The new Blue Book is comprehensive, classifying both non-treated and treated corals, and also artificial products that imitate and/or include coral elements. Normative terms that should be used to describe coral and disclose treatments are listed, as is the terminology that should be applied to define associated artificial products. Methods of maintaining the quality of coral jewellery are provided and the various types of different precious coral species are itemised.

Because of the unique nature of coral, which is an organism grown in nature without human intervention, the Coral Book includes reference to the Washington Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), which entered into force in 1975 to address concerns that many living species were becoming endangered because of commerce between countries. The document also outlines national and regional regulations promoting the sustainable harvesting of coral.

The Coral Book is the sixth in the Blue Book series, and joins the definitive sets of grading standards and nomenclature for diamonds, gemstones, pearls, precious metals, and gemmological laboratories. Each is compiled and updated by relevant CIBJO Commissions, whose members include representatives of trade organisations and laboratories active in the industry.

The Blue Books represent a consensus derived from the broad expertise on the subject within each commission, and also from individuals outside the commissions who had expressed an interest in participating in the development of the guidelines. In the almost complete absence of jewellery industry standards endorsed by the International Standards Organisation (ISO), the CIBJO Blue Books are the most widely accepted set of globally accepted standards.

“The Coral Blue Book is an additional tool developed by CIBJO to ensure ethical business practices and transparency in the jewellery business,” said Gaetano Cavalieri, CIBJO President. “It focuses on a sector that operates in a very fragile eco-environment, where proper standards and methods of operation are absolutely essential. I congratulate Enzo Liverino and his colleagues in the Coral Commission not only for their vision and effort, but also for the contribution they have made to our industry.”

“Although coral has been featured in jewellery for millennia, it remains a product that is not widely understood,” said Mr Liverino. “Our goals in producing the Coral Book of course included creating common sets of standards, practices and nomenclature, similar to those which have been created by CIBJO for other sectors of the industry, but also to address important issues of environmental responsibility and sustainability that are specific to coral. It has been a privilege working with the team on the Coral Commission. This is a milestone for all of us.”

“This is an important document that has provided a proper framework and set of references for the coral sector, corresponding to those that have been established for other sectors in our industry,” said Roland Naftule, CIBJO Vice President and President of Sector A. “It is important to note that its release represents but the end of the first stage in an on-going journey. Each Blue Book is a living document, which is reviewed constantly, and updated and amended when necessary.”

In addition to the Coral Book, CIBJO’s Sector A has recently released online the updated editions of the Diamond Book, the Gemstone Book and the Pearl Book.

The 2015 edition of Diamond Book can be downloaded in PDF format from the CIBJO website by CLICKING HERE.

The 2015 edition of the Gemstone Book can be downloaded in PDF format from the CIBJO website by CLICKING HERE.

The 2015 edition of the Pearl Book can be downloaded in PDF format from the CIBJO website by CLICKING HERE:

CIBJO releases first Blue Book devoted to coral, defining globally acceptable trade and industry practices and nomenclature2017-12-07T11:56:40+00:00

With measurement of carbon footprint and offsetting carbon credits, CIBJO Congress officially becomes jewellery sector’s first carbon-neutral event

AUGUST 25, 2015

With the submission of a report that carefully details the carbon footprint of this year’s CIBJO Congress, which took place in Salvador da Bahia, Brazil, May 4-6, 2015, and the purchase by CIBJO of offsetting carbon credits, the annual gathering of the World Jewellery Confederation is to officially become the first-ever major event in the industry to qualify as carbon neutral.

Carbon-Expert, an environmental consulting organisation that for two years has worked together with CIBJO to ensure that its daily operations are carbon neutral, submitted the completed carbon footprint report earlier this month. This is the first time that an industry event has been rendered carbon neutral, and the goal is that it will be used as a template for future events organized by CIBJO, and in general become a model that can be applied elsewhere in the jewellery sector.

Complying with ISO 14064, which specifies how to quantify and report greenhouse gas  (GHG) emissions and removals, and applying ISO 20121, which offers guidance and best practice for controlling the environmental impact of events, Carbon-Expert carefully measured the carbon footprint of the 2015 CIBJO Congress, accounting for carbon gas emission generated at the congress venue itself, and also by congress participants in their preparation and traveling to and from the event.

In total, about 600 tons of greenhouse gas emissions were associated with the congress, and CIBJO will now purchase carbon credits in order to offset them, and so render the event carbon neutral.

“By making this congress Carbon Neutral, CIBJO is sending a clear message to the industry that all events should wherever possible be carbon neutral, thus minimizing their environmental impact, in order to drive the industry forward and secure the long term future of everyone’s business,” wrote Moya McKeown, an environmental consultant at Carbon-Expert, in the report’s introduction.

“The activities of CIBJO’s Secretariat and administration were certified as carbon neutral both in 2013 and 2014, and we are now expanding the programme to include other activities,” said CIBJO President Gaetano Cavalieri. “Obviously, our carbon footprint represents just a small percentage of that of the entire jewellery sector, but we hope that we serve as a role model for others, who like us are a committed to our industry operating in an environmentally responsible manner. The feedback so far has been most positive.

 “CIBJO has worked towards achieving carbon neutrality for itself since 2013 and, having achieved that goal by the end of 2014, the next step was to focus on the congress,” said Jonathan Kendall, President of CIBJO’s Education and Marketing Commission, who has stood at the vanguard of the organisation’s environmental  campaign. “Now we have achieved carbon neutrality for the Congress held in Brazil in May of this year, our next goal is to encourage and support our members and non-members in the industry to realise the importance of achieving a good environmental record.”

“A number of trade organisations and companies are now working with CIBJO to achieve their own carbon neutral status and we will continue to focus on developing this programme over the coming years,” Mr Kendall added. “It is clear the ‘millennia consumer’ is highly aware of the environment, and as the jewellery industry is so dependent on continuing to attract new customers, the industry must meet this challenge head on.”

The complete carbon foot print report for the 2015 CIBJO Congress can be downloaded from the CIBJO website by CLICKING HERE.

With measurement of carbon footprint and offsetting carbon credits, CIBJO Congress officially becomes jewellery sector’s first carbon-neutral event2017-12-07T11:56:40+00:00

CIBJO welcomes publication of ISO International Standard, explicitly stating that a diamond is of natural origin

JULY 27, 2015

CIBJO has welcomed the publication of ISO International Standard 18323, entitled “Jewellery — Consumer confidence in the diamond industry,” which specifies a set of permitted descriptors for the diamond industry that are designed to be understood by consumers. The new ruling by the International Standards Organisation explicitly defines a diamond as having been “created by nature” and further notes that “the denomination ‘diamond’ without further specification always implies ‘natural diamond.’”

The new ISO International Standard mirrors the definitions outlined in CIBJO’s Diamond Blue Book, which are aligned with those of the International Diamond Council (IDC). The Diamond Blue Book, the IDC Rules, and also the PAS 1048 documents, relating to terminology and classification of grading polished diamonds that were developed by CIBJO with the support of the German Standards Institute (DIN), were cited as the primary sources in the ISO International Standard’s bibliography.

The new standard defines nomenclature that must be used, and also nomenclature that cannot be used, in the buying and selling of diamonds, treated diamonds and synthetic diamonds. In particular, it outlines how to describe synthetic diamonds in a clear and accurate manner. It does not specifically address the grading of diamonds.

The new ISO International Standard defines a synthetic diamond as “an artificial product that has essentially the same chemical composition, crystal structure and physical (including optical) properties as a diamond.” The only permissible terms that may be used to describe it are “synthetic diamond,” “laboratory-grown diamond” or “laboratory-created diamond,” and no abbreviations can be used.

ISO International Standard 18323 unambiguously bars the use of adjectives such as “cultured” and “cultivated,” as well as “real,” “genuine,” “precious” and “gem” to describe any synthetic diamond. The use of such words can be considered deceptive. Furthermore it states, brand names and manufacturers’ names combined with the word “diamond” are insufficient means of disclosure when applied to synthetic diamonds.

The new standard describes a treated diamond as a “diamond having undergone any human intervention other than cutting, polishing, cleaning and setting, to permanently or non-permanently change its appearance.” It states that any diamond having been subject to a treatment shall be disclosed as a “treated diamond,” and/or include a specific reference to the particular treatment. The description must be immediately apparent and unambiguous, and no abbreviations may be used. The new standard furthermore emphasises that the terms “natural treated diamond” or “treated natural diamond” must not be used because they can be misleading. Any special care requirements that should be considered because of a particular treatment must be disclosed.

The process to obtain the new ISO standard began seven years ago in Europe, with CIBJO serving as the lead organisation in a coalition that also included De Beers, Rio Tinto, BHP and the International Diamond Council. Two years ago, it was decided to develop an ISO standard together with a European one, in accordance with the Vienna Agreement, which coordinates work between ISO and CEN, the European Committee for Standardisation. A European or CEN standard that matches ISO International Standard 18323 will be published in several months’ time, although in any case the international standard supersedes the regional one.

The Chairman of the Technical Committee that oversaw the formulation of ISO International Standard 18323 is Harry Levy, who also serves as Vice President of CIBJO’s Diamond Commission.

“This a development of the utmost importance, not only for us in the industry, but first and foremost for jewellery consumers, who are now better protected through international conventions than they previously were,” said Gaetano Cavalieri, CIBJO President. “We are particularly proud, because the ISO standard essentially codifies our Diamond Blue Book rules.”

“A number of individuals need to be commended for what has been years of effort and commitment,” Dr. Cavalieri added. “In addition to Harry Levy, who once again made an invaluable contribution to our industry, thanks are due to Jean-Marc Liberherr, Andy Bone, Stephane Fischler, Tom Nutt, Gerard Grospiron and Dieter Hahn. I would also like to pay special tribute to Rudi Biehler. They all deserve our gratitude.”

CIBJO welcomes publication of ISO International Standard, explicitly stating that a diamond is of natural origin2017-12-07T11:56:41+00:00

CIBJO President lectures business school graduate students about Corporate Social Responsibility in jewellery sector

ABOVE: CIBJO President Gaetano Cavalieri, surrounded by students from ALTIS – Postgraduate Business & Society, the business school of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Milan, to whom he had just lectured about Corporate Social Responsibility in the jewellery industry.

MAY 14, 2015

“Socially responsibility is a way of life. It should never be considered a strategic alternative, which a business may select to increase revenue or to provide itself with a competitive advantage,” said CIBJO President Gaetano Cavalieri, speaking yesterday in Milan to students in the MBA Global Business and Sustainability program at ALTIS – Postgraduate Business & Society, the business school of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, the largest private university in Europe and the largest Catholic University in the world.

In a wide-ranging presentation, Dr. Cavalieri described to the students, who hail from countries around the globe, the development of CSR strategies in the jewellery business, and the specific obligations to society that should be assumed by a luxury product sector.

“We deal in what commonly are considered luxury items,” he stated. “In other words fine jewellery is non-essential, unlike food, energy or pharmaceutical products. Consequently, in the big scheme of things, there is a tendency to view our industry as having limited significance.  But that is not the case. On a global scale the number of individuals directly and indirectly employed by the greater jewellery industry runs into millions, and there are entire countries whose economic wellbeing is dependent upon the products we produce and sell.”

With the increasing public interest in CSR, and with the private sector’s responsibility toward the greater society becoming a fixture in many business school programmes, Dr. Cavalieri has been invited to lecture before numerous academic forums about the specific programmes introduced in the jewellery trade. Among the universities at which he has lectured are the Polytechnic University of Milan and Sciences Po, the Paris Institute of Political Studies.

 

CIBJO President lectures business school graduate students about Corporate Social Responsibility in jewellery sector2017-12-07T11:56:41+00:00

2015 CIBJO Congress closes, with board decision on guidance relating to grading labs

Meeting for the first time in formal session after the close of the 2015 CIBJO Congress in Salvador, Brazil, CIBJO’s new Board of Directors has decided to draft practical guidance, based on CIBJO Blue Book recommendations, for the trade and especially retailers, on the standards and systems that should be expected from grading laboratories.

The Board of Directors also agreed to undertake a robust educational programme targeting retailers that use grading reports when selling gemstones.

Earlier the organisation’s General Assembly elected Gaetano Cavalieri as CIBJO President for another two-year term. Roland Naftule and Eli Avidar were elected to serve as CIBJO’s Vice Presidents. The General Assembly also elected a new board of directors, and officers to head the various sectors and commissions.

The General Assembly also confirmed that the 2016 CIBJO Congress will be held in Yerevan, Armenia, hosted by the Government of Armenia and the Armenian Jewellers Association.

CIBJO’s leadership for the 2015-17 period is as follows:

HONORARY PRESIDENT

Mr. Eli Izhakoff, USA

PRESIDENT
Dr. Gaetano Cavalieri, Italy

VICE PRESIDENTS
Mr. Roland Naftule, USA
Mr. Eli Avidar, Israel

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER AND TREASURER
Mr. Marc-Alain Christen, Switzerland

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Dr. Gaetano Cavalieri, Italy
Mr. Roland Naftule, USA
Mr. Eli Avidar, Israel
Mr. Marc Alain Christen, Switzerland
Mr. Charles Abouchar, Switzerland
Mrs. Ingebjorg Alfsen, Norway
Mr. Nilam Alawdeen, Japan
Ms. Stella Layton, UK
Mr. Uri Ariel, Canada
Mr. Gerard Atlan, France
Mr. Giuseppe Aquilino, Italy
Mrs. Karina Ratzlaff, Germany
Mr. James Courage, UK
Mr. Gagik Gevorkian, Russia
Mr. Ari Epstein, Belgium
Mr. Corrado Facco, Italy
Ms. Cecilia Gardner, USA
Mr. Jacques Branellec, Philippines
Mr. Douglas Hucker, USA
Mr. Jonathan Kendall, UK
Mr. Mehul Durlabhji, India
Mr. Reuven Kaufman, USA
Mr. Nicholas Paspaley, Australia
Mr. Ernie Blom, South Africa
Mr. Udi Sheintal, Israel
Mr. Avi Paz, Israel
Mr. Erik Jens, Netherlands
Mr. Vichian Veerasakri, Thailand
Mr. Benjamin Hackman, USA
Mr. Ruben Bindra, USA

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Dr. Gaetano Cavalieri, Italy
Mr. Roland Naftule, USA
Mr. Eli Avidar, Israel
Mr. Marc Alain Christen, Switzerland
Mr. Gerard Atlan, France
Mr. James Courage, UK
Mr. Avi Paz, Israel
Mr. Corrado Facco, Italy
Ms. Cecilia Gardner, USA
Mr. Douglas Hucker, USA
Mr. Jonathan Kendall, UK
Mr. Gagik Gevorkian, Russia
Mrs. Karina Ratzlaff, Germany
Mr. Udi Sheintal, Israel

PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL
Dr. Gaetano Cavalieri, Italy
Mr. Eli Izhakoff, USA
Mr. Avi Paz, Israel
Mr. Roland Naftule, USA
Mr. Marc-Alain Christen, Switzerland
Mr. Eli Avidar, Israel
Mr. James Courage, UK
Mr. Douglas Hucker, USA
Mr. Jonathan Kendall, UK
Mr. Moti Besser, Israel

SECTOR A
President:
Mr. Roland Naftule, USA
Vice-President: Mr. Thomas Lind, Germany
Vice-President: Mr. Gerard Grospiron, France

SECTOR B
President:
Mr. Willie Hamilton, UK
Vice-President: Mr. Michael Rawlinson, UK
Vice-President: Ms. Karina Sena, Brazil

SECTOR C
President:
Ms. Bernadette Pinet-Cuoq, France
Executive Vice-President: Mr. Simon Rainer, UK
Vice-President: Ms. Carla Pinheiro, Brazil
Vice-President: Ms. Karina Ratzlaff, Germany

ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE NETWORKING COMMISSION
President:
Mr. Simon Rainer, UK
Vice-President: Ms. Sandrine Marcot, France

COLOURED STONE COMMISSION
President:
Mr. Nilam Alawdeen, Japan
Vice-President: Mr. Charles Abouchar, Switzerland
Vice-President:
Mr. Douglas Hucker, USA

DIAMOND COMMISSION
President:
Mr. Udi Sheintal, Israel
Vice-President: Mr. Moti Besser, Israel
Vice-President: Mr. Harry Levy, UK

ETHICS COMMISSION
President:
Ms. Cecilia Gardner, USA
Vice-President: Mr. Udi Sheintal, Israel
Vice-President: Mr. James Riley, UK

GEMMOLOGICAL COMMISSION
President:
Mr. Hanco Zwaan, Netherlands
Vice-President: Dr. Claudio Milisenda, Germany
Vice-President: Dr. Pornsawat Whatanakul, Thailand

INTERNATIONAL TRADE SHOW COMMISSION
President
: Mr. Corrado Facco, Italy
Vice-President: Mr. Adam Lau, Hong Kong
Vice-President: Mr. Jonathan Kendall, UK

MARKETING & EDUCATION COMMISSION
President
: Mr. Jonathan Kendall, UK
Vice-President: Mr. James Riley, UK
Vice-President: Mr. Thomas Lind, Germany

PEARL COMMISSION
President:
Mr. Kenneth Scarratt, Thailand
Vice-President: Mr. Shigeru Akamatsu, Japan
Vice-President: Mr. Jacques Branellec, Philippines
Vice-President: Mr. Peter Bracher, Australia
Vice-President: Mr. Olivier Segura, France

PRECIOUS METALS COMMISSION
President:
Ms. Stella Layton, UK
Vice-President: Mrs. Karina Ratzlaff, Germany
Vice-President: Mr. James Courage, UK

CORAL COMMISSION
President:
Mr. Enzo Liverino, Italy
Vice-President: Ms. Pornsawat Whatanakul, Thailand
Vice-President: Mr. George Lu, Taiwan
Vice-President: Mr. Fabio D’Amico, Italy

INTERNAL FINANCE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE
Mr. Marc Alain Christen, Switzerland
Mrs. Karina Ratzlaff, Germany
Mr. Douglas Hucker, USA
Mr. Jonathan Kendall, UK

Photo Caption: At the podium during the General Assembly session (from left): Hécliton Santini Henriques, President of IBGM; Karina Sena, President of Progemas; Roland Naftule, CIBJO’s Vice President and President of Sector A; Richard Peplow, CIBJO’s outgoing Vice President; Gaetano Cavalieri, CIBJO President; and Marc-Alain Christen, CIBJO’s Chief Financial Officer.

2015 CIBJO Congress closes, with board decision on guidance relating to grading labs2017-10-19T07:51:29+00:00